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U.S. Flag Guidelines as per the United States Army

The flag of the United States is the symbol of our nation. The union, white stars on a field of blue, is the honor point of the flag. The union of the flag and the flag itself when in company with other flags is always given the honor position; for example, the marching right, the flag's own right or an observer's left facing the flag.';

The flag of the United States must always be of current design as prescribed by Title 4, United States Code, Chapter 1 (4 USC Chapter 1). The U.S. flag will always be displayed or carried in ceremonies when any other flags are displayed or carried.

Position and Manner of Display

The flag of the United States is always displayed in the position of honor in parades and other displays.
When the flag of the United States is carried in a procession with other flags, the place of the flag of the United States is on the marching right; or, if there is a line of other flags, in front of the center of that line (see fig 2–1).
The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally but always aloft and free.
When the flag of the United States is displayed from a vehicle, the staff of the flag will be clamped firmly to the right front fender.

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With foreign national flags. When the flag of the United States is displayed with foreign national flags, all flags will be comparable in size. The flagstaffs or flagpoles on which they are flown will be of equal height. The tops of all flags should be of equal distance from the ground.

When a number of flags are grouped and displayed from staffs radiating from a central point, and no foreign flags are involved, the flag of the United States will be in the center and at the highest point of the group (see fig 2–2 for sequence).

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With State flags. When the flag of the United States is displayed with State flags, all of the State flags will be of comparable size. They will be displayed from separate flagstaffs of equal height set on the same level.
Against a wall.
The flag of the United States, when it is displayed with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, should be on the right, the flag's own right, and its staff should be in front of the staff of the other flag (see fig 2–4).

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When the flag of the United States is displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union will be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is to the observer's left facing the display (see fig 2–5).

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When displayed on the wall of a stage, it will be placed above and behind the speaker's stand (see fig 2–6).

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In an auditorium, meeting hall, or chapel. When the U.S. flag is displayed from a staff in an auditorium meeting hall, or chapel, whether on the same floor level or on a platform, it should be in the position of honor at the speaker's or chaplain's right facing the audience or congregation in accordance with 4 USC 7. Other flags should be placed on the left of the speaker or chaplain; that is, to the right of the audience (see figs 2–6 and 2–7).

INSERT FIGURE 2-7 image

Half-staff


For occasions and durations of half-staff display of the flag of the United States, see AR 600–25.
When the flag of the United States is displayed at half-staff, it is first hoisted to the top of the staff for an instant, and then lowered to the half-staff position. The flag should again be raised to the top of the staff before it is lowered for the day.
The flag is in a half-staff position when it is in any position below the top of the pole. Generally, the position of the flag is at half-staff when the middle point of the hoist of the flag is halfway between the top of the staff and the foot. In the case of a flagpole with crosstree or guy cable, the flag should be halfway between the top of the pole and the top of the crosstree or point of attachment of the guy cables (see fig 2–8).
In accordance with the provisions of 4 USC 7, when the President directs that the flag be flown at half-staff at military facilities, naval vessels, and stations abroad, it will be so flown whether or not the flag of another nation is full staff alongside the U.S. flag.

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Placed in mourning. Flags carried by troops will not be placed in mourning unless ordered by the President or the Secretary of the Army. When so ordered, a streamer of black crepe 7 feet long and 1 foot wide will be attached to the staff at the center of the streamer immediately below the spearhead of the U.S. flag and the organizational flag (see fig 2–9).

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Lowering and folding


While the flag of the United States is being lowered from the staff and folded, no portion of it should be allowed to touch the ground. The flag should be folded in the triangular shape of a cocked hat (see fig 2–10).

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At military funerals

On a closed casket, the flag will be placed lengthwise, with the union at the head and over the left shoulder of the deceased. When a full-couch casket is opened, the flag will be removed, folded to the triangular shape of a cocked hat and placed in the lid at the head end of the casket and just above the decedent's left shoulder. When a half-couch casket is opened, the flag will be folded on the lower half of the casket in the same relative position as when displayed full length on a closed casket. The flag will not be lowered into the grave, and it will not be allowed to touch the ground. The internment flag may be given to the next of kin at the conclusion of the internment (see figs 2–11 and 2–12).

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Order of precedence of flags

The following is the order of precedence of flags:
a. The flag of the United States.
b. Foreign national flags. (Normally, these are displayed in alphabetical order using the English alphabet).
c. Flag of the President of the United States of America.
d. Flag of the Vice President of the United States of America.
e. State and territorial flags. Normally, State flags are displayed in order of admittance of the State to the Union. How-ever, they may also be displayed in alphabetical order using the English alphabet. Territorial flags are displayed after the State flags either in the order they were recognized by the United States or alphabetically.
f. Military organizational flags of the Services in order of precedence.
(1) United States Army.
(2) United States Marine Corps.
(3) United States Navy.
(4) United States Air Force.
(5) United States Coast Guard.
g. Military organizational and distinguishing flags within a Service by echelon. The flag for the regimental corps will have precedence immediately before the regimental proponent's command flag. The regimental corps flag will never have precedence above an ACOM flag.
h. Individual and positional flags in order of rank per table 3–1. For the purpose of order of precedence, the term “individual flags” includes the DA SES flag.


Prohibitions

The following rules will be observed:
No lettering or object of any kind will be placed on the flag of the United States.
No other flag or pennant will be placed above the flag of the United States or, if on the same level, to the right of the flag.
The flag of the United States, when flown at a military post or when carried by troops, will not be dipped by way of salute or compliment.
The flag of the United States will always be displayed flat or hanging free. It will not be festooned over doorways or arches, tied in a bow knot, or fashioned into a rosette.
The flag will not be used to cover a speaker's stand or to drape the front of a platform. Bunting of the national colors, arranged with the blue above, white in the middle, and red below, should be used for this purpose and for general decoration.

Other Flags 

Flag of the Office of the President of the United States of America
This flag as authorized in Executive Order (EO) 10860, 5 February 1960 is national flag blue on which is centered the Presidential coat of arms in proper colors, circled by white stars, the same number as in the union of the U.S. flag. The fringe is silver and gold bullion. Cords and tassels are red, white, and blue (see fig 3–1).

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Office of the Vice President of the United States of America
This flag as authorized in EO 11884, 7 October 1975 is white with a blue five-pointed star in each corner. The Vice Presidential coat of arms, in proper colors, is centered on the flag. The fringe is blue; cord and tassels are blue and white (see fig 3–2).

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Office of the Secretary of Defense
This flag (approved by the President of the United States, 7 October 1947) is medium blue on which is centered an Amer-ican bald eagle, with a white five-pointed star in each corner. The eagle's wings are displayed horizontally; its talons grasp three crossed arrows, all in proper colors. A shield with blue chief and 13 red and white vertical stripes is on the eagle's breast. The fringe is white; cord and tassels are medium blue and white (see fig 3–3).

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Office of the Deputy Secretary of Defense
The design of this flag (approved by the President of the United States, 20 April 1949) is the same as that of the Secretary of Defense, except the background is white; the four stars and fringe are medium blue; cord and tassels are medium blue and white (see fig 3–4).

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Offices of the Under Secretaries of Defense
This flag (approved by the Secretary of Defense, 18 February 1959) is medium blue with a dark blue triangle starting in each corner of the base. The apex is in the vertical center of the flag between four white, five-pointed stars, two to hoist and two to fly. Centered on the flag is the device from the DOD seal, in proper colors, with the wings of the eagle extending into the blue on each side. The fringe is white, cord and tassels are medium blue and white (see fig 3–5).

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Offices of the Assistant Secretaries of Defense
The design of this flag (approved by the President of the United States, 16 August 1949) is the same as that of the Deputy Secretary of Defense, except the four stars and fringe are Old Glory red; cord and tassels are Old Glory red and white (see fig 3–6).

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Principal Deputy Under Secretaries of Defense
The design of this flag is the same as that of the Under Secretaries of Defense except the flag is dark blue with a medium blue triangle starting in each corner of the base; cord and tassels are dark blue and white (see fig 3–7).

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Presidentially Appointed Senate Approved Specified Officials
The design of this flag is the same as that of the Assistant Secretaries of Defense, except the four stars and fringe are old glory blue; cord and tassels are old glory blue and white. These officials include: DOD Deputy Chief Management Officer; Director, Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation; Director, Operational Test and Evaluation; DOD General Counsel; and the DOD Inspector General (see fig 3–8).

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Office of the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
The flag (approved by the Secretary of Defense, 6 December 1949) background is divided diagonally from upper hoist to lower fly with medium blue above white. Centered on the flag is an American bald eagle with wings spread horizontally, in proper colors. The talons grasp three crossed arrows. A shield with blue chief and 13 red and white stripes is on the eagle's breast. Diagonally, from upper fly to lower hoist are four five-pointed stars, two white on the medium blue, and two medium blue on the white. The fringe is yellow; cord and tassels are medium blue and white (see fig 3–9).

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Office of the Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
This flag (approved by the Secretary of Defense, 20 January 1987) is white with a diagonal medium blue stripe from upper hoist to lower fly. Centered on the flag is an American bald eagle with wings spread horizontally, in proper colors. The talons grasp three crossed arrows. A shield with blue chief and l3 red and white stripes is on the eagle's breast. Diagonally, from upper fly to lower hoist are four five-pointed stars, medium blue on the white, two above the eagle, and two below. The fringe is yellow; cord and tassels are medium blue and white (see fig 3–10).

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Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
This flag (approved by the Chairman, JCS, 30 November 2005) background is divided diagonally from upper hoist to lower fly with medium blue above white. Centered on the flag is the insignia of the Senior Enlisted Advisor in full color — a shield containing an American bald eagle with wings spread horizontally, in proper colors. The talons grasp three crossed arrows. A shield with blue chief and 13 red and white stripes is on the eagle’s breast between two white five-pointed stars bordered yellow at the top and two blue five-pointed stars bordered yellow at the bottom. The fringe is yellow; cord and tassels are medium blue and white (see fig 3–11).

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Office of the Chief, National Guard Bureau
The flag has a 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly with a background divided diagonally from upper hoist to lower fly, ultramarine blue above and dark blue below. Centered on the flag is the branch insignia for the National Guard Bureau in yellow with four white five-pointed stars horizontally centered, two on each side of the insignia. Above the branch insignia is a white scroll inscribed “1636” in red letters. Below the branch insignia is a white scroll inscribed “National Guard” in red letters. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–12).

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Office of the Vice Chief, National Guard Bureau
This flag (approved by the Chief, National Guard Bureau, 28 December 2012) background is divided diagonally from upper hoist to lower fly and from upper fly to lower hoist. The upper and lower sections are ultramarine blue, and the end sections dark blue. Centered on the flag is the branch insignia for the National Guard Bureau in yellow with three white five-pointed stars, two horizontally centered on each side of the insignia and one centered above the insignia. Above the branch insignia and star is a white scroll inscribed “1636” in red letters. Below the branch insignia is a white scroll inscribed “NATIONAL GUARD” in red letters. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–13).

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Office of the Secretary of the Army
This flag (approved by the Secretary of War, 3 March 1897) is scarlet on which is centered the U.S. coat of arms in proper colors, with a white five-pointed star in each corner. The fringe is white; cord and tassels are scarlet and white (see fig 3–14).

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Office of the Under Secretary of the Army
This flag (approved by the Secretary of the Army, 21 September 1949) is the same design as the Secretary of the Army's flag, except the background is white, the stars and fringe are scarlet; cord and tassels are scarlet and white (see fig 3–15).

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Offices of the Assistant Secretaries of the Army and General Counsel
This flag (approved by the Secretary of the Army, 21 September 1949) is the same design as the Under Secretary of the Army's flag, except the stars and fringe are old glory blue; cord and tassels are old glory blue and white (see fig 3–16).

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Offices of the Principal Staff Assistants to the Secretary of the Army
The flag is white, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with the Coat of Arms of the United States in proper colors centered thereon. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–17). The following offices are authorized this flag:
a. Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army.
b. Office of the Director, Small Business Programs.
c. Office of the Auditor General.
d. Office of the Chief Legislative Liaison.
e. Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army.
f. Office of the Executive Director Army National Military Cemeteries

INSERT FIGURE 17

Office of the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army
The flag (approved on 6 July 1917) background is divided diagonally from upper fly to lower hoist, in scarlet and white, with scarlet uppermost. The insignia of the General Staff, a five-pointed white star, surmounted by the U.S. coat of arms in proper colors, is centered on the flag. Four five-pointed stars are horizontally centered on the flag, two on each side of the insignia. The two stars on the scarlet area are white and the two on the white are scarlet. The fringe is yellow; cord and tassels are scarlet and white (see fig 3–18).

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Office of the Vice Chief of Staff, U.S. Army
The flag (approved by the Deputy Chief of Staff for Administration, 15 December 1949) background is divided diagonally from upper hoist to lower fly and from upper fly to lower hoist. The upper and lower sections are white, and the end sections scarlet. The insignia of the Army General Staff, a five-pointed white star surmounted by the U.S. coat of arms is centered on the flag in proper colors. Four white five-pointed stars are horizontally centered, two on each side of the insignia. The fringe is yellow; cord and tassels are scarlet and white (see fig 3–19).

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Office of the Director of Army Staff
The flag has a yellow base, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with the insignia for the General Staff (a black star surmounted by the coat of arms of the United States in yellow). On the eagle’s breast is a shield with red and white stripes and a blue chief. The fringe is black (see fig 3–20).

INSERT FIGURE 20

Sergeant Major of the Army
The flag (approved by the Chief of Staff, Army, 22 March 1999) background is divided diagonally from lower hoist to upper fly with scarlet above white. Centered on the flag is the insignia of the Sergeant Major of the Army. On a shield divided from lower left to upper right, the upper part red and the lower part white, a silver five-pointed star surmounted by the coat of arms of the United States in proper colors between two white five-pointed stars at the top and two red five-pointed stars at bottom. The fringe is yellow; the cords and tassels are scarlet and white (see fig 3–21).

INSERT FIGURE 21

Office of The Adjutant General
The flag has a dark blue base, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with the branch insignia for The Adjutant General's Corps (a shield with red and white vertical stripes and a blue chief with white stars). The fringe is scarlet (see fig 3–22).

INSERT FIGURE 22

Office of the Chief, Army Reserve
The flag is teal blue, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with a bust of a Minuteman in profile within a wreath formed by two olive branches, all yellow, above a yellow scroll inscribed “United States Army Reserve“ in teal blue letters. Below the scroll are the numerals “1908” in yellow. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–23).

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Office of the Chief of Chaplains
This flag has a white base, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with a medium blue disc within a yellow border with the lower portion of a yellow sun radiating four yellow rays, surmounted by a white dove in flight viewed head-on, its wings stretched across the four rays, holding in its beak a green olive branch. Below is an open book with purple binding and plain white pages. Across the center of the white pages is inscribed “PRO DEO ET PATRIA” in yellow letters. Above the disc is a red scroll inscribed “1775” in yellow numerals. Below the disc is a red scroll inscribed “UNITED STATES ARMY” in yellow letters. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–24).

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Office of the Chief of Engineers
On a scarlet flag, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, is the branch insignia for the Corps of Engineers in white, detailed black with red windows. The fringe is white (see fig 3–25).

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Office of The Inspector General
On a dark blue flag, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, is the branch insignia for The Inspector General in light blue with white lettering and outlines. The fringe is light blue (see fig 3–26).

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Office of The Judge Advocate General
On a dark blue flag, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, is the branch insignia for The Judge Advocate General's Corps in white. The fringe is white (see fig 3–27).

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Office of the Provost Marshal General
On a green flag 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly is the branch insignia for the military police in yellow. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–28).

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Office of the Chief of Public Affairs
On a teal blue flag, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, the branch insignia of the Public Affairs in yellow. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–29).

INSERT FIGURE 29

Office of The Surgeon General
On a maroon flag 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly is the branch insignia for the U.S. Army Medical Department in white. The fringe is white (see fig 3–30).

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General of the Army
This flag is scarlet, 4-foot 4-inch hoist by 5-foot 6-inch fly, with a circular pattern of five white, five-pointed stars. The fringe is yellow, cord and tassels are scarlet and white (see fig 3–31).

INSERT FIGURE 31

General officers
This flag is scarlet, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly with a horizontal line of white five-pointed stars, the number indicating the grade. For U.S. Army Medical Department general officers the flag base is maroon; for chaplains, purple. The fringe for all general officers individual flags is yellow (see figs 3–32 through 3–35).

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INSERT FIGURE 33

INSERT FIGURE 34

INSERT FIGURE 35

Senior Executive Service
This flag is white, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with the SES keystone in gold centered on the flag, encircled by the words “Department of the Army Senior Executive Service“ in gold letters on a dark blue background. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–36).

INSERT FIGURE 36

Scientific and professional
This flag is white, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with the senior scientific and professional keystone device in gold centered on the flag, encircled by the words “Department of the Army Scientific and Professional” in gold letters on a red designa-tion band. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–37).

INSERT FIGURE 37

Senior level
This flag is white, 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly, with the senior level keystone device in gold centered on the flag, encircled by the words “Department of the Army Senior Level” in gold letters on a green designation band. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–38).

INSERT FIGURE 38

General officers of the Army National Guard whose ranks are not federally recognized
These general officers flags will be prescribed by the State concerned, providing the design is not similar to or in conflict with flags prescribed in this regulation). To avoid conflict and to provide a recognized State system, the DA has suitable flag designs that may be used if desired by the States. The flag designs, adaptable to each State, have a national flag blue background with the crest of the individual State ARNG organization in proper colors. The fringe is yellow. Individual flag designs are as follows:
a. Lieutenant general. The crest is vertically centered below one white five-pointed star. Two white five-pointed stars are horizontally centered on the flag (see fig 3–39).

INSERT FIGURE 39

b. Major general. The crest is centered between two white five-pointed stars horizontally centered on the flag (see fig 3–40).

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c. Brigadier general. The crest is vertically centered below one white five-pointed star (see fig 3–41).

INSERT FIGURE 41

Civilian Aide to the Secretary of the Army
The flag (approved by the Secretary of the Army, 13 August 2003) is white on which is centered the U.S. Coat of Arms in proper colors on a scarlet background, encircled by the words “Secretary of the Army Civilian Aide” in yellow letters, separated by two yellow bullets at center line, with letters on a green designation band with an inner and outer border in yellow. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–42).

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U.S. Army Reserve Ambassador
The flag (approved by the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1, 12 March 2009) is white on which is centered the emblem of a U.S. Army Reserve Ambassador consisting of an American bald eagle in proper colors with wings displayed, encircled by two yellow olive branches. Centered above the eagle and between the displayed wings are two white stars. The background of the emblem is blue. On a blue designation band encircling the emblem is the inscription “UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE” at top and “AMBASSADOR” at bottom in yellow with an inner and outer border in yellow. The fringe is yellow (see fig 3–43).

INSERT FIGURE 43

Medal of Honor Flag
Description - A light blue flag 3-foot hoist by 4-foot fly bearing thirteen white stars in a configuration as on the Medal of Honor ribbon. The fringe is gold (see fig 3–44).

This flag is presented to each person to whom a Medal of Honor is awarded at the same time as the presentation of the medal, or as expeditiously as possible to each living recipient who has not already received a flag. In the case of a posthumous presentation of the medal, the flag is presented to the person to whom the medal is presented. The flag will also be awarded upon written request to the Military Awards Branch at the U.S. Army Human Resources Command to the primary next of kin of deceased Medal of Honor recipients.

Display
The Medal of Honor flag is a ceremonial flag for indoor use and is considered a personal flag that recipients may display in their home or office.
The Medal of Honor flag may be displayed publicly when the individual is being honored at an official military ceremony or the individual is in attendance on the reviewing stand in an official ceremony. If the flag is displayed on a flagstaff, the flagstaff will be 8 feet tall, but shall not be higher than the U.S. flag if displayed at the same time.
When the flag is displayed with the flag of the United States, the U.S. flag will hold the position of superior prominence and the position of honor on the right. The Medal of Honor flag will be placed to the left of the U.S. flag. When viewed from an audience the U.S. flag will be on the left and the Medal of Honor flag will be on the right.
The flag should always be displayed in an attractive, dignified, and secure manner.

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The U.S. Army Ceremonial flag and U.S. Army Display flag
The U.S. Army Ceremonial flag, approved by EO 10670, 12 June 1956, is the senior flag of the Army. The U.S. Army Ceremonial flag is white with a 4-foot 4-inch hoist by 5-foot 6-inch fly, trimmed on three sides with yellow fringe 2 1/2 inches wide. The device of the DA seal in ultramarine blue, (without the roman nu-merals) is centered thereon. A scarlet scroll inscribed “UNITED STATES ARMY” in white, is centered between the device and the ultramarine blue numerals “1775”. The U.S. Army Display flag is of the same design and colors as the U.S. Army Ceremonial flag except it has a 3-foot hoist and 4-foot fly (see fig 4–1).

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4-2 Streamers on Army Flag

Army commands
The distinguishing flag for ACOMs is national flag blue background with a yellow fringe on three sides. Centered on the flag is the Coat of Arms of the United States in proper colors. Centered above the Coat of Arms is the organizational SSI and below the Coat of Arms is a designation scroll. The SSI is piped in white if the border is other than white or yellow (see fig 5–1).

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Army service component command
The distinguishing flag for ASCCs is national flag blue background with a yellow fringe on three sides. Centered on the flag is the organizational SSI, 15 inches high. Below that is a designation scroll. The SSI is piped in white if the border is other than white or yellow (see fig 5–2).

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers divisions, districts, laboratories, and separate offices
A distinguishing flag is authorized for use by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers divisions, districts, laboratories, and separate offices not authorized flags in their own right. This authority does not apply to TOE engineer units and installation engineer support activities and will not be displayed on military installations. The flag is scarlet on which is centered the insignia of the branch for the Corps of Engineers in white with detailed black and scarlet windows and doors. There is no fringe (see fig 7–9).

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Convention of Geneva flag
The flag is a white rectangular flag with a red cross with straight arms of equal length centered thereon (see fig 7–10).

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Display of Streamers

Figure 9-1

U.S. Unit Decoration Streamers for Ceremonial Use

(1) Presidential Unit Commendation (Army) (Air Force). A blue streamer with the name of the inscription in white

(2) Presidential Unit Commendation (Navy). A streamer consisting of an 11/16 inch blue stripe, a 1 3/8 inch gold stripe and an 11/16 inch scarlet stripe. The name of the inscription will be in white (see fig 9–5).

(3) Valorous Unit Award. A streamer with nine stripes taken from the center design of the Valorous Unit Award as follows: 3/16 inch blue, 3/32 inch white, 7/16 inch blue, 7/16 white, 7/16 inch red, 7/16 inch white, 7/16 inch blue, 3/32 inch white, and 3/16 inch blue. The inscription will be in yellow (see fig 9–6).

(4) Air Force Gallant Unit Commendation. A streamer with the following stripes: 1/4 inch old glory red, 11/16 inch old glory blue, 1/4 inch white, 3/8 inch old glory red, 1/4 inch white, 11/16 inch old glory blue, and 1/4 inch old glory red (see fig 9–7).

(5) Navy Unit Commendation. A streamer with the following stripes: 1/4 inch blue, 1/4 inch yellow, 1/4 red, 1 1/4 inch green, 1/4 inch red, 1/4 inch yellow, and 1/4 inch blue. The inscription will be in white (see fig 9–8).
Figure 9–8. Navy Unit Commendation

(6) Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army). A scarlet streamer with the inscription embroidered in white. When two or more awards of the Meritorious Unit Commendation have the same inscription, service dates of the awards may be added to distinguish between the commendations (see fig 9–9).

(7) Air Force Meritorious Unit Award. A streamer with the following stripes: 1/4 inch old glory red, 1/16 inch white, 1/4 inch old glory red, 7/16 inch white; 3/4 inch old glory blue, 7/16 inch white, 1/4 inch old glory red, 1/16 inch white, and 1/4 inch old glory red (see fig 9–10).

(8) Meritorious Unit Commendation (Navy). A streamer with the following stripes: 13/16 inch green, 1/8 inch Air Force yellow, 3/16 inch ultramarine blue, 1/8 inch Air Force yellow, 1/4 inch scarlet, 1/8 inch Air Force yellow, 3/16 inch ultramarine blue, 1/8 inch Air Force yellow, and 13/16 inch green (see fig 9–11).

(9) Coast Guard Unit Commendation. A streamer with the following stripes: 1/4 inch ultramarine blue, 1/4 inch Air Force yellow, 1/4 inch cardinal red, 17/32 inch myrtle green, 3/16 inch white, 17/32 inch myrtle green, 1/4 inch cardinal red, 1/4 inch Air Force yellow, and 1/4 inch ultramarine blue (see fig 9–12).

(10) Army Superior Unit. A streamer with the following stripes. 1 1/16 inch scarlet, 1/16 inch yellow, 1/2 inch green, 1/16 inch yellow, and 1 1/16 inch scarlet. The inscription will be in white (see fig 9–13).

(11) Air Force Outstanding Unit. A streamer with the following stripes: 1/4 inch red, 1/8 inch white, 3/4 inch dark blue, 1/8 inch white, 1/4 inch red, 1/8 inch white, 3/4 inch dark blue, 1/8 inch white, 1/4 inch red. The inscription will be in white (see fig 9–14).
Figure 9–14.

Foreign decoration streamers

(1) French Croix de Guerre World War I. A streamer with stripes of 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch green, 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch green, 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch green, 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch green, 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch green, 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch green, 1/8 inch red. The star or palm is centered on the streamer between the hoist end and the first letter of the inscription. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–15).

(2) French Croix de Guerre World War II. A streamer with stripes of 11/16 inch red, 1/4 inch green, 1/8 inch red, 1/4 inch green, 1/8 inch red, 1/4 inch green 1/8 inch red, 1/4 inch green, and 11/16 inch red. The star or palm is centered on the streamer between the hoist end and the first letter of the inscription. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–16).

(3) French Medaille Militaire. A yellow streamer 1 7/8 inches with a 7/16 inch green stripe on each edge. The inscrip-tion is scarlet (see fig 9–17).

(4) Belgian Croix de Guerre. A streamer with stripes of 3/16 inch pimento, 1/16 inch green, 3/16 inch pimento, 1/16 inch green, 3/16 inch pimento, 1/16 inch green, 1 1/4 inch pimento, 1/16 inch green, 3/16 inch pimento, 1/16 inch green, 3/16 inch pimento, 1/16 inch green, and 3/16 inch pimento. The palm is centered between the hoist end and the first letter of the inscription. The inscription is white (see fig 9–18).

(5) Luxembourg Croix de Guerre. A streamer with stripes of 7/32 inch yellow, 1/2 inch blue, 3/16 inch yellow, 3/8 inch blue, 3/16 inch yellow, 3/8 inch blue, 3/16 inch yellow, 1/2 inch blue, and 7/32 inch yellow. The inscription is white (see fig 9–19).

(6) Philippine Presidential Unit Citation. A streamer with stripes of 29/32 inch ultramarine blue, 15/16 inch white, and 29/32 inch Old Glory red. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–20).

(7) Croce al Merito di Guerra (Italy). A streamer with stripes of 5/8 inch blue, 7/16 inch white, 3/8 inch blue, 7/16 inch white, and 5/8 inch blue. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–21).

(8) Military Order of William (Netherlands). A streamer with stripes of 13/32 inch yellow, 11/32 inch blue, 1 1/4 inches yellow, 11/32 inch blue, and 13/32 inch yellow. The inscription is dark blue (see fig 9–22).

(9) Ordem da Torre e Espada (Portugal) (Order of the Tower and Sword). Streamer is oriental blue. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–23).

(10) Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation. A streamer with stripes of 13/32 inch green, 1/32 inch white, 1/32 inch red, 1/32 inch white, 1/32 inch red, 1/32 inch white, 1/32 inch green, 1 9/16 inch white, 1/32 inch green, 1/32 inch white, 1/32 inch red, 1/32 inch white, 1/32 inch red, 1/32 inch white, and 13/32 inch green. Centered 5 inches from the hoist is the Korean Taeguk in red and blue with red uppermost, 2 inches in diameter. The inscription is dark blue (see fig 9–24).

(11) Chryssoun Aristion Andrias (Bravery Gold Medal of Greece). A streamer with stripes of 21/32 inch brittany blue, 7/16 inch white, 9/16 inch brittany blue, 7/16 inch white, and 21/32 inch brittany blue. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–25).

(12) Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry. A streamer with stripes of 3/4 inch red, 1 1/4 inches yellow, and 3/4 inch red. Eight pairs of thin red lines are on the yellow stripes. The palm or star is centered between the hoist end of the streamer and the first letter of the inscription. The inscription is white (see fig 9–26).

(13) Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions. Streamer with stripes of 5/32 inch green, 3/8 inch pimento, 3/4 inch green, 1/32 inch pimento, 1/8 inch green, 1/32 inch pimento, 3/4 inch green, 3/8 inch pimento, and 5/32 inch green. The palm is centered between the hoist end and the first letter of the inscription. The inscription is white (see fig 9–27).

Infantry and medical streamers
Combat infantry, expert infantry, combat medical, expert medical and combat action streamers are awarded to a unit when the requirements in AR 600–8–22 have been met. Stripe dimensions in the following descriptions are for streamers dis-played with flags. For streamers displayed with guidons, the stripe dimensions are one-half those given for flags.

a. Combat infantry.
(1) First award. A white streamer with “Combat Infantry Brigade,” “Combat Infantry Battalion,” “Combat Infantry Company,” or “Combat Infantry Platoon” embroidered in blue (see fig 9–28).

(2) Additional awards. A blue star, 1 1/2 inches in diameter, is embroidered on the combat infantry streamer. The first star is placed 1 1/2 inches after the last letter on the streamer and each additional star is placed so that the stars are spaced 1 inch apart (see fig 9–29).

b. Expert infantry. A white streamer with “Expert Infantry Brigade,” “Expert Infantry Battalion,” “Expert Infantry Company,” or “Expert Infantry Platoon” embroidered in blue (see fig 9–30).

c. Combat medical streamer. A maroon streamer with a white stripe on each edge 1/16 inch wide, with “Combat Med-ical Brigade,” “Combat Medical Battalion,” or “Combat Medical Company” embroidered in white (see fig 9–31).

d. Expert medical streamer. A maroon streamer with a white stripe on each edge 1/16 inch wide with “Expert Medical Brigade,” “Expert Medical Battalion,” or “Expert Medical Company” embroidered in white (see fig 9–32).

e. Combat action streamer. A black streamer with “Combat Action Brigade,” “Combat Action Battalion,” Combat Action Squadron,” “Combat Action Troop,” “Combat Action Company,” or “Combat Action Platoon” embroidered in yellow (see fig 9–33).

Campaign Streamers
Streamers for various wars and yarn colors for embroidery of inscriptions are as described below. Inscriptions, arrowheads, and earned honor devices are prescribed in AR 600–8–22 (see table 4–1 for list of campaign streamers).
a. Revolutionary War. A scarlet streamer with a 1/2 inch center white stripe. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–34).

b. War of 1812. A scarlet streamer with two 3/8 inch white stripes 1/2 inch apart. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–35).

c. Mexican War. A green streamer with 1/2 inch center white stripe. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–36).

d. Civil War (Federal Service). A streamer divided horizontally with blue above gray. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–37).

e. Civil War (Confederate Service). Campaign streamers and war service streamers will be awarded for active Confed-erate military service as an exception to the requirement of “active Federal military service.“ The streamer is divided horizontally gray above blue. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–38).

f. Indian Wars. A streamer with stripes of 1/2 inch scarlet, 3/4 inch black, 1 inch scarlet, 3/8 inch black, and 1/2 inch scarlet. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–39).

g. War with Spain. A streamer with stripes of 1/4 inch yellow, 3/4 inch blue, 3/4 inch yellow, 3/4 inch blue, and 1/4 inch yellow. The inscription is scarlet (see fig 9–40).

h. China Relief Expedition. A yellow streamer with a 1/8 inch blue border at the top and bottom. The inscription is blue (see fig 9–41).

i. Philippine Insurrection. A streamer with stripes of 1/8 inch blue, 5/8 inch red, 1 1/4 inches blue, 5/8 inch red, and 1/8 inch blue. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–42).

j. Mexican Expedition. A streamer with stripes of 1/4 inch green, 3/4 inch yellow, 3/4 inch blue, 3/4 inch yellow, and 1/4 inch green. The inscription is white (see fig 9–43).

k. World War I. A streamer with two rainbows (blend colors from top to center and from bottom to center) divided by a red center stripe. The inscription is white (see fig 9–44).

l. World War II American Theater. A streamer with stripes of 3/8 inch blue, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch black, 1/8 inch red, 1/8 inch white, 3/8 inch blue, 1/4 inch triparted blue, white, and red, 3/8 inch blue, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch red, 1/8 inch black, 1/8 inch white, and 3/8 inch blue. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–45).

m. World War II Asiatic-Pacific Theater. A streamer with stripes of 3/8 inch yellow, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch red, 1/8 inch white, 1/2 inch yellow, 1/4 inch triparted blue, white, and red, 1/2 inch yellow, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch red, 1/8 inch white, and 3/8 inch yellow. The arrowhead is used when authorized. The inscription is blue (see fig 9–46).

n. World War II European-African-Middle Eastern Theater. A streamer with stripes of 3/8 inch brown, 1/8 inch green, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch red, 1/2 inch green, 1/4 inch triparted blue, white, and red, 1/2 inch green, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch black, 1/8 inch white, and 3/8 inch brown. The arrowhead is used when authorized. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–47).

o. Korean War. A light blue streamer edged top and bottom with a 1/16 inch white border and with a 1/4 inch white center stripe. The arrowhead is used when authorized. The inscription is golden yellow (see fig 9–48).

p. Vietnam Service. A streamer with the pattern of the Vietnam Service Medal ribbon with stripes of 1/4 inch green, 5/8 inch yellow, 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch yellow, 1/8 inch red, 5/16 inch yellow, 1/8 inch red, 5/8 inch yellow, and 1/4 inch green. The inscription is white (see fig 9–49).

q. Armed Forces Expeditions. A streamer with the pattern of the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal ribbon with stripes of 3/16 inch green, 3/16 inch yellow, 3/16 inch brown, 3/16 inch black, 7/16 inch blue, 1/8 inch ultramarine blue, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch scarlet, 7/16 inch blue, 3/16 inch black, 3/16 inch brown, 3/16 inch yellow, 3/16 inch green. The inscription is white. The Armed Forces Expeditionary streamer is used to reflect campaign credit participation in the Do-minican Republic, Grenada, Panama and Somalia (see fig 9–50).

r. Southwest Asia. A streamer with the pattern of the Southwest Asia Service Medal ribbon with stripes of 1/8 inch black, 1/4 inch chamois, 1/8 inch blue, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch red, 3/8 inch chamois, 3/16 inch green, 1/8 inch black, 3/16 inch green, 3/8 inch chamois, 1/8 inch red, 1/8 inch white, 1/8 inch blue, 1/4 inch chamois, and 1/8 inch black. The in-scription is white (see fig 9–51).

s. Kosovo. A streamer with the pattern of the Kosovo Campaign Medal ribbon with stripes of 1 inch old glory blue, 7/32 inch scarlet, 5/16 inch white, 7/32 inch old glory blue, and 1 inch scarlet. The inscription is yellow (see fig 9–52).

t. War on Terrorism-Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary. A streamer with the pattern of the Global War on Ter-rorism Expeditionary Medal ribbon with stripes of 5/16 inch bluebird, 3/16 inch old glory blue, 1/8 inch white, 3/16 inch old glory blue, 1/8 inch bluebird, 1/8 inch golden yellow, 1/8 inch bluebird, 3/8 inch scarlet, 1/8 inch bluebird, 1/8 inch golden yellow, 1/8 inch bluebird, 3/16 inch old glory blue, 1/8 inch white, 3/16 inch old glory blue, and 5/16 inch bluebird. The inscription is yellow (see fig 5–53).

u. War on Terrorism-Afghanistan. A streamer with the pattern of the Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon with stripes of 5/32 inch emerald, 3/8 inch scarlet, 1/4 inch black, 7/16 inch white, 1/16 inch scarlet, 1/16 inch white, 1/16 inch old glory blue, 1/16 inch white, 1/16 inch scarlet, 7/16 inch white, 1/4 inch black, 3/8 inch scarlet and 5/32 inch emerald. The inscription is yellow (see fig 9–54).

v. War on Terrorism-Iraq. A streamer with the pattern of the Iraq Campaign Medal ribbon with stripes of 5/16 inch scarlet, 1/8 inch white, 1/16 inch green, 1/8 inch white, 5/16 inch black, 7/8 inch chamois, 5/16 inch black, 1/8 inch white, 1/16 inch green, 1/8 inch white and 5/16 inch scarlet. The inscription is scarlet (see fig 5–55).

War service streamers
A war service streamer is awarded to a flag-bearing or guidon-bearing organization for service in a theater or area of operations during a war or conflict when the organization is not entitled to campaign credit. The war service streamer is identical to the applicable campaign streamer, but without inscription (see fig 9–56).

Safety excellence streamer
A green ribbon with two white stripes and a white embroidered inscription “SAFETY EXCELLENCE” is authorized to indicate accident prevention measures and success (see fig 9–57).

Streamers for Army rifle and pistol teams
Streamers are of the same material as the guidons and are authorized in the following colors: blue, gray, red, green, gold, silver, maroon, purple, brown, and orange.

Streamers for Reserve Officers’ Training Corps affiliation
ROTC unit affiliated to Signal, Ordnance, or Engineer branches may display a branch color streamer on the school flag when approved by the proponent of the branch of the Active Army. Inscription will be “(Branch)-ROTC AFFILIATION” in white (see fig 9–58).

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